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the risks you take

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It is known that keeping your cell phone close all night is not good for you. But many do not know the real risks they run. here they are

Photo source: (vizual.it)

It is not at all healthy, having the smartphone a few steps from our face, all night long. This is news that has been alarming us for some time and that we know well. If this is really necessary, it is better to set the device to 'Air mode'.

But the cell phone on the bedside table at night can be dangerous even when turned off loading. Unlike a daily recharge, where we are vigilant, the night recharge can be very dangerous.

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Charging your cell phone at night, that's where you run dangers

Smartphone on the bedside table: keeping it close at night is dangerous
Photo source: (medisalute.it)

Often, we are led to charge our smartphone at night, from the fact that our use and the weight of the App has brought it to almost 0% in battery. Unfortunately though, the fact that charge your cell phone at night, while not checking it, can be dangerous, is a fact that also has many testimonials, but let's see why.

In the latest generation of mobile phones, there is an internal circuit that disconnects the flow of electrons, since the charge is 100%, but in slightly older devices, this is not expected. However, there are some things to consider, variables that, if they change, can still endanger us, such as the outside temperature.

While we sleep, we are much less inclined to foresee a danger, but the possibility of a fire is instead quite high. If something went wrong, because of an excess of temperature caused by electric blankets, electric heaters or even incandescent lamps on the bedside table, a few steps from the device, the latter could catch fire and become a huge threat. For this, it is better to recharge it before bed and at most, then leave it off nearby, with no electrical wires attached. Or, we might consider activating a timer that disconnects the power supply to the device during the night.

About the author

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Barry Lachey is a Senior Editor at Zobuz. Previously he has worked for FOX Sports and MSNBC's "Morning Joe." he is a graduate of the Annenberg School at the University of Southern California. You can reach Barry via email or by phone.

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